Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

by Theodore E. Warkentin

Publisher: Informa Healthcare in New York

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 817
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Subjects:

  • Heparin,
  • Thrombocytopenia,
  • Chemically induced,
  • Anticoagulants,
  • MEDICAL,
  • Side effects,
  • Hematology,
  • Adverse effects,
  • Therapeutic use

Edition Notes

Get this from a library! Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. [Theodore E Warkentin; Andreas Greinacher;] -- Although first reported in , immune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) remains one of the most potentially devastating and frequent adverse drug reactions encountered by physicians. This work. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia Mild to moderate Thrombocytopenia or a 50 percent reduction after exposure to heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin Arterial and venous thrombosis.   Fourteen of 39 patients (% [–]) with suspected HIT were ultimately excluded because of negative functional assays. Drug‑induced thrombocytopenia tended to be more frequent in Excluded HIT at the time of HIT suspicion (p = ). The platelet course was similar between Confirmed and Excluded HIT (p = ). Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in patients treated with low-molecular weight or unfractionated heparin. NEJM, , 3. 4. Eichinger S, Kyrle PA, Brenner B, et al (). Thrombocytopenia associated with low-molecular weight heparin. Lancet,, ; 5 Aster RH (). Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia and thrombosis.

  Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, or HIT, occurs in some patients who have been taking the anticoagulant (blood thinner) heparin. Less commonly, drugs related to heparin called low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) can cause HIT. Heparin and LMWH are used to treat clotting disorders, to prevent blood clots in certain heart conditions, and to Cited by: 1.   Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia Essay. Thrombocyopenia can be induced with the use of heparin. Furthermore, this condition is called heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) syndrome. It occurs in result to an immune response to the use of heparin. It is less common when using unfractionated heparin, like Lovenox. One of these is heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a common, serious and potentially life-threatening condition [1,2], and one for which diagnosis can be difficult [3]. SUMMARY. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a prothrombotic complication of treatment with heparin. It is associated with mild-to-moderate thrombocytopenia, although the main clinical concern is the high frequency of both arterial and venous thromboembolism, which may be limb- or life-threatening.

Type 2: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome (HITTS) is associated with severe thrombocytopenia and paradoxically thrombotic episodes instead of hemorrhagic complications. Occurs in patients receiving heparin for more than 5 days; may occur within 1 day if prior heparin therapy exposure. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type I is harmless, causing a mild and transient reduction in platelet count. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II (HIT) is a more serious autoimmune disease causing a low platelet count and paradoxical blood clotting. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II occurs in 1–5% of patients started on heparin. Thrombocytopenia is a condition characterized by abnormally low levels of thrombocytes, also known as platelets, in the blood.. A normal human platelet count ranges from , to , platelets per microliter of blood. These limits are determined by the th lower and upper percentile, so values outside this range do not necessarily indicate stic method: Complete blood count. Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) can be defined as a decrease in platelet count that can occur during or shortly after exposure to heparin. HIT is considered to be the most important and most frequent drug-induced type of Size: KB.

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Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia, Fifth Edition explores: Clinical and laboratory studies on HIT The immune basis and pathogenesis, animal models, and laboratory testing for HIT antibodies5/5(1). Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Sell Us Your Books Best Books of the Month 14 results for Books: "heparin-induced thrombocytopenia".

Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia, Fifth Edition explores: Clinical Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia book laboratory studies on HIT The immune basis and pathogenesis, animal models, and laboratory testing for HIT antibodies.

Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Maria T. DeSancho, MD and Jacob H. Rand, MD. Approximately 1% to 5% of patients receiving heparin develop thrombocytopenia. – The decrease in platelet count typically occurs after 5 to 12 days of exposure to heparin but may develop sooner if there has been prior exposure to heparin during the preceding Cited by:   Although first reported inimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) remains one of the most frequent and devastating adverse drug reactions encountered by physicians.

This thoroughly updated fifth edition from international experts Professors Warkentin Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia book Greinacher is the gold standard for accurate diagnosis and management of this cond.

Although first reported inimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) remains one of the most potentially devastating and frequent adverse drug reactions encountered by physicians. This Fourth Edition reinforces its standing as the leading guide to the accurate diagnosis and management of HIT by identifying key signs and symptoms of this d.

Onset typically days after initial Heparin exposure (range is days). May present in Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia book 24 hours if prior Heparin exposure (within last 90 days); Often presents as a new thrombotic event while on Heparin therapy; Type II HIT is a clinically devastating event.

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) Immune complexes (heparin-PF4-IgG) cause platelet activation via the platelet Fcγreceptor for IgG (FcγRIIA) Thrombocytopenia High risk of thrombosis Occurs in ~50% of untreated cases May be venous (DVT, PE) or arterial (limb ischemia, stroke, MI) Thrombotic complications can be fatal.

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a complication of heparin therapy and is characterized by two types. 1 HIT I is a benign, mild thrombocytopenia, which usually occurs within 2 days after heparin administration.

Because the platelet count normalizes even with continued heparin therapy, it is not associated with increased thrombotic risk. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is heparin’s most clinically relevant nonhemorrhagic complication. It is an immune complication caused by antibodies directed to complexes containing heparin and an endogenous platelet protein, platelet factor 4 (PF4).

Although the immune reaction is common (8% to 50%), clinical complications of thrombocytopenia and thrombosis are far less Cited by:   Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis (HITT) Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) of a pro-thrombotic type (e.g. associated with malignancy or sepsis) Acute DIC/liver necrosis/limb necrosis syndrome: Shock liver causes depletion of protein C and anti-thrombin, with subsequent microvascular thrombosis of extremities.

Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (4th ed.) (Fundamental and Clinical Cardiology series) by Theodore E. Warkentin. Although first reported inimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) remains one of the most potentially devastating and. Moved Permanently. The document has moved by: 5. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is the development of thrombocytopenia (a low platelet count), due to the administration of various forms of heparin, an predisposes to thrombosis (the abnormal formation of blood clots inside a blood vessel) because platelets release microparticles that activate thrombin, thereby leading to lty: Hematology.

Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in cardiovascular surgery patients. However, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare but life-threatening complication of prophylaxis or treatment. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a profoundly dangerous, potentially lethal, immunologically mediated adverse drug reaction to unfractionated heparin or, less commonly, to low–molecular weight heparin.

In this comprehensive review, the authors highlight heparin-induced thrombocytopenia’s risk factors, clinical presentation, pathophysiology,Cited by: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a syndrome of platelet activation, thrombocytopenia, and thrombosis that occurs in % of patients who receive heparin.

HIT is a clinicopathologic diagnosis where laboratory testing plays an essential role. Accurate and timely diagnosis is essential to avoid potentially life- or limb- threatening thrombotic complications. Although first reported inimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) remains one of the most frequent and devastating adverse drug reactions encountered by physicians.

This thoroughly updated fifth edition from international experts Professors Warkentin and Greinacher is the gold standard for accurate diagnosis and management of this condCited by: Description: This book reviews the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic features, and treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

Purpose: The purpose is to expound on the pathogenesis of this syndrome, inform the reader of a better diagnostic approach to the syndrome, and to cover new therapies.

This syndrome is becoming more. ASH has developed a series of brief, evidence-based pocket guides to help physicians provide quality care to patients. The guides cover such topics as thrombocytopenia in pregnancy, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, red blood cell transfusion, anticoagulant dosing and management, and von Willebrand disease.

A year-old man with coronary artery disease who has recently undergone bypass surgery presents with dyspnea. Laboratory testing reveals a platelet count of 86, per cubic millimeter, as Cited by: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a potentially life-threatening immune complication that occurs after exposure to unfractionated heparin (UFH) or, less commonly, to low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs).

1 It is characterized by declining platelet counts beginning 5 to 14 days after heparin exposure and occurs in isolation (isolated HIT) or concurrently with new arterial and venous Cited by: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT I) is a severe, life-threatening, and immunological drug reaction.

According to the clinical-laboratory characteristics, there are two types of HIT: type I (HIT I) and type II (HIT II). HIT I is the result of non-immunologic, direct interaction of heparin with the platelet surface.

Contrary, HIT II is immunologically induced (antibody-mediated) and life Author: Maja Tomicic, Irena Jukic, Ana Hecimovic, Tomislav Vuk.

Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) can be defined as any clinical event (or events) best explained by platelet-activating antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies (HIT antibodies) in a patient who is receiving, or who has recently received, heparin.

From: The Vein Book, Related terms: Warfarin. Thrombocytopenia is a serious condition in which patients have a low platelet count. This can occur due to certain disease processes such as alterations in the immune system or with leukemia.

However, not all thrombocytopenia is due to such system alterations. This is the case with Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, or HIT. INTRODUCTION. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a life-threatening complication of exposure to heparin (ie, unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight [LMW] heparin) that occurs in up to 5 percent of patients exposed, regardless of the dose, schedule, or route of administration.

Background: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an antibody-mediated adverse drug reac- tion that can lead to devastating thromboembolic complications, including pulmonary embolism, ischemic limb necrosis necessitating limb amputation, acute myocardial infarction, and stroke.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xx, pages: illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm. Contents: 1. History of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia / Theodore E. Warkentin Clinical picture of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia / Theodore E. Warkentin Frequency of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia / David H.

Lee and Theodore E. Warkentin Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune mediated disorder resulting from exposure to heparin May result in loss of limb or life Typical onset days after heparin exposure.

Epidemiology. Incidence: 1 to 3% of those on Heparin >4 days. LMWH is much less likely (only 1/6 of Heparin risk); Background.

Immune mediated disorder. IgG Antibody against Heparin-platelet factor 4 (PF4) complex; Onset days after Heparin exposure. Onset earlier with prior Heparin exposure; Two types. Type I is mild, and just requires monitoring. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated complication of heparin therapy.

The use of heparin to flush some vascular access devices makes HIT a concern for infusion nurses. This article reviews the risk factors for, pathophysiology of, and management of HIT. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia: A Comprehensive Clinical Review.

J Am Coll Cardiol ; The following are 10 key points from this review article on heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT): HIT is a dangerous, potentially lethal, immunologically-mediated adverse drug reaction to unfractionated heparin (UFH) or, less commonly, low.Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a clinicopathologic syndrome characterized by a constellation of clinical findings and identification of antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies.

Classically in HIT, progressive thrombocytopenia is observed, reaching a nadir within 5–10 days following the immunizing heparin : Anne M. Winkler.